Lanyard-Research

Lanyard definition

A lanyard is a cord or strap worn around the neck, shoulder, or wrist to carry such items as keys or identification cards. In the military, lanyards were used to fire an artillery piece or arm the fuze mechanism on an air-dropped bomb by pulling out a cotter pin (thereby starting the arming delay) when it leaves the aircraft. They are also used to attach a pistol to a body so that it can be dropped without being lost. Aboard a ship, it may refer to a piece of rigging used to secure or lower objects.

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Types of splices

Examples of splices in different stages of completion, from the Nordisk familjebok: a) long splice b) tapered short splice c) eye splice d) short splice

  • back splice (also called an end splice) – A splice where the strands of the end of the rope are spliced directly back into the end without forming a loop. It is used to finish off the end of the rope to keep it from fraying. The end of the rope with the splice is about twice the thickness of the rest of the rope. With nylon and other plastic materials, the back splice is often no longer used; the rope strands are simply fused together with heat to prevent fraying.

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A line eye-spliced to a snap shackle.

  • eye splice – A splice where the working end is spliced into the working part forming a loop.
  • ring splice – Attached the working end of a rope to a ring or clew.
  • chain splice – Attached the working end of a rope to a chain.
  • figure-eight "splice" knot- A splice-like bend knot used for joining two ropes.
  • horseshoe splice – A cut splice where the two sides of the loop are of unequal length.
  • long splice – A splice used to join two rope ends forming one rope the length of the total of the two ropes. The long splice, unlike most splice types, results in a splice that is only very slightly thicker than the rope without the splice, but sacrifices some of the strength of the short splice. It does this by replacing two of the strands of each rope end with those from the other, and cutting off some of the extra strands that result. The long splice allows the spliced rope to still fit through the same pulleys, which is necessary in some applications.

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Accessory for electronics

A USB flash drive with a branded lanyard. Another feature is the black plastic part (break-away). This is a predetermined and reattachable breaking point. It is meant to prevent accidental strangulation when the lanyard is worn around the neck.

Lanyards are widely used with small electronic devices such as cameras, MP3 players and USB flash drives to prevent loss or dropping. 

Badge or identification holder

Lanyards are commonly used to display badges, tickets or ID cards for identification where security is required, such as businesses, corporations, hospitals, prisons, conventions, trade fairs, and backstage passes used in the entertainment industry.

 

Safety strap

Lanyards are also often attached to dead man's switches or "kill switches" on dangerous machinery, such as large industrial cutting or slicing machines; on vehicles, such as jet-skis or trains; and on exercise treadmills, so that if the operator suddenly becomes incapacitated, their fall will pull on the lanyard attached to their wrist, which will then pull the switch to immediately stop the machine or vehicle.

 

Lineman lanyards

Lineman lanyards are used by lineman utility and other workers to prevent falls, although similar straps are also used recreationally by mountain climbers. This type of lanyard will have a section of heavy-duty nylon strapping attached to a metal ring or carabiner which tightens around an attachment point. The strap may be a fixed length or adjustable, and will attach to the wearer to support them against a fixed object or pole.[3]

 

Uniform accessories

Certain lanyards are still worn on uniforms as decorations similar to an aiguillette or fourragère. Among these are the Orange Lanyard in the Military William Order of the Netherlands and the German Armed Forces Badge of Marksmanship.

 

 

Common styles

  • Polyester imprinted lanyards
  • Nylon imprinted lanyards
  • Tube imprinted lanyards
  • Dye-sublimated lanyards or full-color lanyards

 

Rope splicing in ropework is the forming of a semi-permanent joint between two ropes or two parts of the same rope by partly untwisting and then interweaving their strands. Splices can be used to form a stopper at the end of a line, to form a loop or an eye in a rope, or for joining two ropes together.

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An unfinished cut splice

 

  • cut splice (originally called cunt splice) – A splice similar to the eye splice. It is typically used for light lines (e.g., the log-line) where a single splice would tend to come undone, the rope being frequently wet.It makes a very strong knot. A cut splice is a join between two ropes, made by side splicing the ends slightly apart, to make an eye in the joined rope which lies shut when the rope is taut. Its original name was bowdlerised to "cut splice".

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A short splice, with ends whipped

  • short splice – Also a splice used to join the ends of two ropes, but the short splice is more similar to the technique used in other splices and results in the spliced part being about twice as thick as the non spliced part, and has greater strength than the long splice. The short splice retains more of the rope strength than any knots that join rope ends.
  • Soft shackle – Dyneema soft shackles are strong, light and safe and are increasingly replacing stainless steel shackles.

Splices are often tapered to make the thicker splice blend into the rest of the line. There are two main types of tapering, the standard and the "West Coast Taper".

  • Standard tapers progressively remove a portion of each remaining strand—one-third at a time is typical, resulting in a taper of two additional tucks beyond the splice—thus making each successive tuck produce a narrower splice. This is only practical with laid-lines, i.e., those made up of numerous strands laid side by side.
  • West Coast taper (also known as a Fisherman's Taper) is effected by extra-tucks of entire strands, such that the second strand is interweaved one more time than the first and the third is interweaved an additional time after the second.

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